Programmes and events

Hui | Education Programme

By exploring Paratene Matchitt’s exhibition Hui, students will understand the innovation and invention that led him to become one of New Zealand’s iconic artists. The programme consists of a discussion and hands-on activity.

Workshop: Students create a human figure inspired by the sculptures. Students collaborate with each other and will co-present their final works with a concept based on the idea of Hui.

  • Curriculum strands: Visual Arts, English and Social Studies
  • Duration: 90 minutes
  • NCEA: 1.2-2.2-3.2- 1.1-2.1-3.1
  • Cost: Free
  • Suitable: All levels
  • Dates: Until 18 March 2018

Paratene Matchitt is one of New Zealand’s most prominent senior artists. Matchitt’s 60-year career has seen his work in most public art gallery collections in this country. Paratene has a reputation for breaking with tradition, for innovation, and for invention.

From the 1930s artists recognised the need for an expressly New Zealand school of art that was distinct from the modernist conventions travelling here from Europe and America. Efforts to create this New Zealand language were complicated by the space existing between Māori and Pākehā art. Early on in the piece Pākehā artists were absorbing or appropriating Māori iconography, a predictable development in a search for a national artistic identity. Paratene’s willingness to incorporate European influences into his own work is described by some academics as testimony to a ‘Māori Modernism’, or by others as a ‘Māori Primitivism’. It is most certainly the case that Paratene draws from multiple artistic sources, bringing them together in a complex amalgam.

Following the Second World War, Department of Education encouraged a generation of Māori artists to draw on their cultural traditions in developing modernist art. Para was employed as an art adviser by the department and began to follow the suggestion. Para drew particular inspiration from the great Spanish modernist Pablo Picasso. He applied Picasso’s style to the representation of traditional stories such as the separation of Rangi and Papa.

Life Will Go on Long After Money | Education Programme

Sculptor Ben Pearce has installed a large-scale interactive work in the gallery. Based on the true story of a man who built himself a get-away on the boulder bank of Nelson’s inlet, Pearce’s sculpture is a fascinating revisit of the event in which Ben himself played a surprising role. In the education programme, students explore ideas surrounding the meaning of home. The programme consists of a discussion and hands-on activity.

  • Curriculum strands: Visual Arts, English and Social Studies
  • Duration: 90 minutes
  • NCEA: 1.2-2.2-3.2- 1.1-2.1-3.1
  • Cost: Free
  • Suitable: All levels
  • Dates: Until 25 March 2018

Discussion: Students will discuss what home means using these questions:

What emotions do you associate with home?

How does it feel to be away from home? How does it feel to return home?

Who do you associate with home?

Why would someone like to live away from civilisation? (Not just spatially removed, but also removed from everything society provides, including the means of survival (food, etc.) and the rule of law).

What challenges might someone have living off grid?

What memories could someone make by living away from society?

What kind of skills would someone need to learn to be able to live off grid?

Workshop: Students imagine what would happen if they had no money and want to leave civilisation. Based on that, they will design a paper house and answer the questions listed below in their design.

  • Where would you build your own house?
  • What material would you use to build your house?
  • Is it like a normal house? A tree house? A boat house? Or something else?
  • How big or small would it be?
  • What are the things you would have to have in your house?
  • What would you take with you if you were to live off grid for ever?
  • How would you find food?
  • What are the things that you can make yourself without paying money for?

PLAY: Art that makes you move

Students play and engage with three different interactive artworks.

  • Curriculum strands: Visual Arts and Social Studies
  • Duration: One hour
  • Suitable: Primary, Intermediate, Secondary
  • NCEA: 1.2-2.2-3.2- 1.1-2.1-3.1
  • Cost: Free
  • Dates: 2 April -20 July 2018

Move and play through giant inflated capsules of Seung Yul Oh’s Periphery. Students will study how Oh used simple scientific rules to create extraordinary art works. Students explore the roles of air, form, space and scale in his artwork, they also discover and role of audience in interacting with the artwork through discussion and hands on activity.

Imagine and build your own cityscape using hundreds of wooden blocks designed by Sara Hughes for Heretaunga. The shapes referenced in the blocks are taken from buildings on Heretaunga Street and the surrounding streets in Hastings. Students find out about the buildings and places that Hughes took inspiration from. They learn how art can engage with specific sites and expand people’s experience of a place through discussion and interacting with the artwork

Touch, tap, strike and slap on the designs to trigger the sounds. Students make music with Campbell Tamahina Burns’ Inner Geometries. The copper tape design is connected to sound boards and each line of tape will trigger a different sound file. Students will be able to compose sequences or simply explore the sound response to their tracing of the design.

Each school visit will be split in to two parts, one part allows the students to play and interact with the art works and the second part is discussion and hands-on activities.

 

 

Early Childhood Education Programme

PLAY: Art that makes you move

Children play and engage with three different interactive artworks.

Move and play through giant inflated capsules of Seung Yul Oh’s Periphery. Children explore the roles of air, form, space and scale in his artwork, they also discover and role of audience in interacting with the artwork through discussion and hands on activity.

Imagine and build a cityscape using hundreds of wooden blocks designed by Sara Hughes for Heretaunga. The shapes referenced in the blocks are taken from buildings on Heretaunga Street and the surrounding streets in Hastings. Find out about the buildings and places that Hughes took inspiration from during your visit.

Touch, tap, strike and slap on the designs to trigger the sounds. Children make music with Campbell Tamahina Burns’ Inner Geometries. The copper tape design is connected to sound boards and each line of tape will trigger a different sound file. Children will be able to compose sequences or simply explore the sound response to their tracing of the design.

Each visit will be split in to two parts, one part allows the students to play and interact with the artworks and the second part is a short discussion and hands-on activities.

 

  • Duration: 45 minutes to one hour
  • Suitable: Early Childhood
  • Cost: Free
  • Dates: 2 April -20 July 2018

 

Volunteer Programme

Do you have spare time?
Are you interested in being involved in the creative community?
Would you like to learn more about the arts?
If you answered yes to any of these questions then it’s you we are looking for!

The gallery is a publicly funded facility available to the community and visitors free of charge, 7 days a week. We are looking for people who might be interested in assisting with workshops, openings, floortalks and much more. If you have specific skills that would be of great value to the gallery, we’d love to hear from you, to become part of our new volunteer programme.

Full details of the programme are in the link below. For further information please contact Tricia Johnson, Arts Liaison and Exhibition Coordinator by email triciaj@hdc.govt.nz or by phone on 06 8715095.

HCAG Volunteer Application

HCAG Volunteer Agreement

Youth Art Ambassador Programme (YAAP) A chance to be heard and make a real difference to what goes on at the Gallery

YAAP 2017 artist workshop YAAP 2017 artist workshop

YAAP applications are closed for 2018.

About YAAP

Hastings City Art Gallery recognises the valuable contribution that young people make to the gallery. It is committed to creating relevant and meaningful opportunities for young people, enabling them to take an active role in shaping what happens at the Gallery. The Gallery is keen to support youth talent through providing events that raise the profile of local young people and is running a special programme for youth, known as YAAP: Youth Art Ambassador Programme.

A group of young people between the ages of 14 and 19 will meet up regularly every month from March to August 2018. We want young people’s voices to be heard and make a real difference to what goes on in the Gallery.

Upon completion of the Youth Art Ambassador Programme 2018, students will receive a Certificate of Participation.

How to get involved

Are you aged 14 to 19? Are you interested in having a say in the future of the Gallery’s programme? Do you want to gain new skills and meet new people? If the answer is yes, keep an eye out in February 2019 when we will open applications for the next Youth Art Ambassador programme, which will begin in March 2019. Places are limited and there will be a selection process once all applications have been received.

What? A chance for you to meet with other young people and gallery staff to discuss your thoughts, opinion and suggestions about the gallery as we develop our exhibitions and activities over the next two years. You’ll also will understand the diverse roles of gallery staff, giving insight into exciting career pathways. The programme also provide artists, mentorship and workshops to reinforce commitment to exceeding academic expectations with your art portfolio.

You are encouraged to share the knowledge gained during the programme with your teachers and peers – as an Ambassador for the Gallery’s exhibitions and events throughout the community.

Where? Hastings City Art Gallery- Auaha room

When? Meetings will be monthly and are usually held on Wednesday afternoons from 3:45 to 5pm.

What are the benefits?

  • Your opinions will shape the future of your local contemporary art gallery
  • Have your say in the gallery’s public programme and events
  • Develop new skills and experiences- which look great on your CV, university form or job applications
  • Learn from a variety of artists and participate in workshops with them
  • Make new friends
  • Free food and drink
  • Entry to all events and workshops at the gallery for the year
  • See what goes on behind the scenes

Interested in finding out more? Please contact Elham Salari at elhams@hdc.govt.nz or the Gallery at 06-871 5095.

Everyday Lines Education Programme

In this programme we will talk about how artists draw from the world around them and alter and change the meaning of objects that we use every day. As well as a guided tour of the galleries, and discussion about the artworks on display in Everyday Lines exhibition, there will be a hands-on workshop.

Curriculum strands: Visual Arts, English and Social Studies

  • Duration: 90 minutes for Primary and Intermediate Schools and up to 45 minutes for Secondary Schools
  • NCEA: 1.2-2.2-3.2- 1.1-2.1-3.1
  • The Popcorn workshop is suitable for years 1 to 8
  • Available: 15 September – 30 November 2017
  • Cost: Free

Discussion: Students will consider how and why artists use everyday objects as subject matter.

  • Students understand how non-traditional materials can be vehicles of artistic expression
  • Students will discuss the question “Can anything be considered art?”
  • Students will reflect on how placing an object in a gallery changes the object and how calling something art can change perception of an object.
  • Students will consider the choices artists make when creating works of art, exploring subject matter and sources of inspiration, medium and style.
  • Students will make connections between consumer cultures, ready-mades and art.

Hands-on activity: The workshop activity is inspired by the Popcorn work by artist Madeleine Child. Students will make a colourful popcorn lei by using popcorn and natural dyes extracted from everyday vegetables such as turmeric, cabbage and beetroot. Students will be encouraged to reflect on their work in reference to the earlier discussion. They will be given the options to choose between eating their popcorn lei at the end or keeping it as a work of art.
Post visit project ideas:

  • Challenge students to re-create an everyday object (using a material such as modelling clay or, if possible, polyurethane foam) in a way that could trick the naked eye. Ask students what they have learned from the sculpting process. What were the challenges and how did they address them?
  • Tell students to look out for types of assemblages similar to Gaby Montejo’s work or Still Life by Martin Selman. When they find something similar, ask them to record it with a photograph or sketch. Analyse the groupings and talk about connections between the objects, layout, space etc. Are these casual and random or carefully contrived? Based on this discussion invite the students to create a new installation and photograph or draw it. Talk about the process of placing objects so that they appear to be random.
  • What other materials and processes do people use to represent real things? Ask students to be aware of the simulated objects they come across over the course of a week. These could be props on television and movies, decorative objects in homes, or even materials such as fake wood. Ask them to record these items by making notes or drawing. At the end of the week, invite students to share what they have found with the class. What techniques do people use to create these things? Do they always strive to make them seem real? Why or why not? What functions do these replicas or representations serve?
  • Ask student to bring in an object that they don’t mind turning into art- an old phone, a basket, a hairbrush, a lamp… and then work with them to create a sculptures or still life assemblages.

If you would like to make a booking for a class, or would like further information please email elhams@hdc.govt.nz or contact the Gallery on 06 871 5095.

Photography Education Programme: See What I Can See

Book your class in for an education programme based on the exhibitions, Into The Light and See What I Can See, a comprehensive survey exhibition inspired by the book, See what I can see: New Zealand Photography for the young and curious, written by Gregory O’Brien.

The programme will start with a tour of the exhibition and discussion about the photographs and photographic techniques. Students will then participate in a hands-on workshop.

Student reflections on the programme:

“The exhibition was full of amazing pieces of work by many famous New Zealand artists such as Anne Nobel, Glenn Busch, Ans Westra and many others. It was inspirational and very relevant to the work we are doing in class. We were all asked to choose our favourite two pieces and discuss them. I found that when we discussed these ideas, our knowledge from the classroom came flowing out. We also took part in a workshop where we were able to play around with different layering of photos to create our own image. Overall, I found this experience gave us many different perspectives on photography and helped to develop ideas and talking points.”
Jessica Guy

“To observe and learn how people use photography from a little place like Hawke’s Bay was eye opening. Being able to discuss each technique gave me great insight and helped me make links to benefit my own work. Creating my own art in a short workshop was a great learning opportunity that will be helpful in future work, both in design and photography.”
Ava Bake

Discussion: Students will discuss the techniques and visual strategies used by the artists, including use of light, time of day, vantage point, focus, cropping, framing, composition, use of colour palette to create mood and to influence the viewer’s perception of a subject.

Workshop: Inspired by artist Nova Paul’s film; This is not Dying, students will use CMYK colour-separated transparencies of photographs from the exhibition and explore the techniques and visual storytelling through layering these. They will create a range of constructed photographic images that address Paul’s concept and also convey new narratives.

NCEA: 1.2-2.2-3.2- 1.1-2.1-3.1

Duration: 90 minutes, with flexibility to meet your timeframe.

Suitable: For Year 1-13

Available: 29 May – 11 August 2017

Cost: Free

Read more about This is not Dying Nova Paul

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

Featured images: Nova Paul, This is not Dying, 2010. 16mm film transferred to HD video, 20 minutes. Courtesy of the artist.

 

Gallery Explorer: Drawing from Art

Students will respond to what they see in the gallery through a range of activities including drawing, aiming to develop their own observation based imagery.
This programme gives students the opportunity to observe and draw, using the style, techniques and conventions of the exhibiting artists. Secondary students can also use this programme to research artworks in their selected field.

• Students will examine how works are arranged in order to communicate the artist’s ideas. They will use thinking skills to talk about how art works are composed.
• Students will analyse the relationships between elements in the work.
Key competencies: Thinking, using language symbols and texts, participating and contribution, managing self, relating to others
Curriculum strands: Visual Arts: understanding the arts in context, communicating and interpreting, developing practical knowledge, developing ideas. English: listening, reading, viewing and speaking, writing and presenting.

NCEA: 1.2-2.2-3.2- 1.1-2.1-3.1.
Duration: One hour, however, we can change it to meet your timeframe.
Suitable: For Year 1-13
Available: Throughout the year
Cost: Free

Iwitoi Kahungunu Education Programme

NCEA: 1.2-2.2-3.2- 1.1-2.1-3.1
Duration: 90 minutes, however, we can change it to meet your timeframe.
Suitable: Year 1-13
Available: 20 February-14 May 2017
Cost: Free

How do artworks tell stories? During this programme, we look at carving, cloaks, paintings and woven artworks in the exhibition and find out how some artists use art-making techniques we are familiar with to tell a story visually.
Students then collaborate in a hands-on activity using a foam printing technique to develop a collective work based on their own treasured objects. Students will learn and share ideas such as:
What is Taonga (treasure)? What are their treasured objects? Why it is special to them and the story behind it. How do they look after it? What might it contribute to the story that their collective work may tell?
• Key competencies: Thinking, Using language symbols and texts, Participating and contribution, Managing self, Relating to others
• Curriculum strands: Visual Arts (Understanding the arts in context, Communicating and interpreting, Developing practical knowledge, Developing ideas). English (Listening, Reading, Viewing and Speaking, Writing and presenting).
This school program is developed with NCEA achievement standards, curriculum levels and key competencies in mind. Learning activities can be adapted to meet needs of each of year level and the relevant curriculum/NCEA objectives.

Featured Artwork: Artist Levi Waihape
Title: Tangaroa
Medium: Acrylic on Canvas