Everyday Lines Education Programme

In this programme we will talk about how artists draw from the world around them and alter and change the meaning of objects that we use every day. As well as a guided tour of the galleries, and discussion about the artworks on display in Everyday Lines exhibition, there will be a hands-on workshop.

Curriculum strands: Visual Arts, English and Social Studies

  • Duration: 90 minutes for Primary and Intermediate Schools and up to 45 minutes for Secondary Schools
  • NCEA: 1.2-2.2-3.2- 1.1-2.1-3.1
  • The Popcorn workshop is suitable for years 1 to 8
  • Available: 15 September – 30 November 2017
  • Cost: Free

Discussion: Students will consider how and why artists use everyday objects as subject matter.

  • Students understand how non-traditional materials can be vehicles of artistic expression
  • Students will discuss the question “Can anything be considered art?”
  • Students will reflect on how placing an object in a gallery changes the object and how calling something art can change perception of an object.
  • Students will consider the choices artists make when creating works of art, exploring subject matter and sources of inspiration, medium and style.
  • Students will make connections between consumer cultures, ready-mades and art.

Hands-on activity: The workshop activity is inspired by the Popcorn work by artist Madeleine Child. Students will make a colourful popcorn lei by using popcorn and natural dyes extracted from everyday vegetables such as turmeric, cabbage and beetroot. Students will be encouraged to reflect on their work in reference to the earlier discussion. They will be given the options to choose between eating their popcorn lei at the end or keeping it as a work of art.
Post visit project ideas:

  • Challenge students to re-create an everyday object (using a material such as modelling clay or, if possible, polyurethane foam) in a way that could trick the naked eye. Ask students what they have learned from the sculpting process. What were the challenges and how did they address them?
  • Tell students to look out for types of assemblages similar to Gaby Montejo’s work or Still Life by Martin Selman. When they find something similar, ask them to record it with a photograph or sketch. Analyse the groupings and talk about connections between the objects, layout, space etc. Are these casual and random or carefully contrived? Based on this discussion invite the students to create a new installation and photograph or draw it. Talk about the process of placing objects so that they appear to be random.
  • What other materials and processes do people use to represent real things? Ask students to be aware of the simulated objects they come across over the course of a week. These could be props on television and movies, decorative objects in homes, or even materials such as fake wood. Ask them to record these items by making notes or drawing. At the end of the week, invite students to share what they have found with the class. What techniques do people use to create these things? Do they always strive to make them seem real? Why or why not? What functions do these replicas or representations serve?
  • Ask student to bring in an object that they don’t mind turning into art- an old phone, a basket, a hairbrush, a lamp… and then work with them to create a sculptures or still life assemblages.

If you would like to make a booking for a class, or would like further information please email elhams@hdc.govt.nz or contact the Gallery on 06 871 5095.